Women release Agreement Proposal for South China Sea urging stand-down



“It is time to stand down and talk,” says a global civil society women’s group on the topic of the South China Seas conundrum.

Key members and operations specialists in China, Brunei, Vietnam, Taiwan, the Philippines and Indonesia, say, “China appears to have been retaliating against American allies in the region because of America’s bullying of China.

Raucous aggression in the South China Sea against ordinary people led the RINJ Women to worry about the thousands of fishermen in Malaysia, Indonesia, Vietnam and in the Republic of the Philippines.


South China Sea news update by Micheal John and Melissa Hemingway


In Philippines Waters, the US Navy

PHILIPPINE SEA (17 March 2021) The amphibious dock landing ship USS Ashland (LSD 48) fires the MK 15 close-in weapons system. Ashland is temporarily assigned to Task Force 71/Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 15, the Navy’s largest forward-deployed DESRON and the U.S. 7th Fleet’s principal surface force. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Madysson Anne Ritter)

“These poor people have been unable to carry out their traditional fishing activities for bringing food to the table during the global pandemic. Their boats are being sunk or rammed. Our women’s civil society group has offered a treaty proposal,” says Geraldine Frisque, a spokesperson for The RINJ Foundation.

“We are pushing for peace and harmony for a cooling off period where the parties can agree to work together to preserve the waterways and natural resources for the local nations,” she added.

American Submarines are not far from current conflict between Philippines and China.

Since the 6th of March, China’s naval militia has assembled some 220 ships in an imposing formation in Philippines waters.

SANTA RITA, Guam (March 22, 2021) Chief Hospital Corpsman Reypablo Reyes, a native of Polillo Island, Philippines, assigned to USS Key West (SSN 722), explains his duties and responsibilities as an independent duty corpsman aboard a submarine. Key West is one of multiple forward-deployed submarines assigned to Commander, Submarine Squadron 15 out of Polaris Point, Naval Base Guam. (U.S. Navy video by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kelsey J. Hockenberger)


“The problems may lie in past American racism and bullying and the current fear of America that it has lost its trade dominance around the world to a viable competitor, China,” says Katie Alsop of The RINJ  Foundation.

“America is the lone superpower in the world and it is using its massive military power to coerce the nations around the South China Sea,” she added. “American actions have brought China’s retaliation against US allies in the region as a form of surrogate beatings,” she claimed.

America injects massive nuclear arsenals into the South China Sea to enforce its corporate business position that it is a better seller than China and it forces its allies to buy American technologies instead of the better Chinese networking infrastructures. It kidnaps a woman who is a global corporate leader of Huawei Technologies.

“Washington is not a member of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS). It does not abide law of the sea conventions but has much to say about China and why it should fall into place in manner approved by the USA,” noted Simon Baldock, an Israel-based security analyst.

“Washington has long harassed the People’s Republic of China seeking a tormented bully-victim which was then challenged to rise above, and China did rise above the decades of bullying,” claims the China state-supported news media.

“In order to achieve this [rise of China], an action plan was implemented with horizontal and vertical policy interventions, setting as the primary goal the eradication of absolute poverty and at the same time adopting a strategy for rural vitalization as this is a key condition for achieving the 2nd centennial goal,” explained Greek scholar Pelagia Karpathiotaki, on Saturday. He is a Researcher of the Academy of China Open Economy Studies (UIBE), also a Foreign Expert UIBE.

“The United States frequently sends aircraft and vessels into the South China Sea to flex its muscles,” the foreign ministry spokesman, Zhao Lijian, told reporters, yesterday. “This is not conducive to peace and stability in the region,” she added.

SOUTH CHINA SEA 08.27.2020

South China Sea Commander, U.S. 7Th Fleet Waters Near The Paracel Islands (August 27, 2020) Seaman Chris Czaiczynski, from New Haven, Mich., stands lookout watch on the bridge wing as the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Mustin (DDG 89) conducts routine operations. Mustin is forward-deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations in support of security and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Cody Beam)

“Let’s be clear about this, we are not talking about conventional weapons.”

Then freshly minted U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper back in August 2020, said about intermediate range missiles he wants installed in Asia, “Let’s be clear about this, we are not talking about conventional weapons.”

Let's be clear about this, we are not talking about conventional weapons.

Then freshly minted U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper back in August 2020, said about intermediate range missiles he wants installed in Asia, “Let’s be clear about this, we are not talking about conventional weapons.”” (See Video Below) Photo Credit: Video Capture.  Photo Art/cropping: Rosa Yamamoto FPMag

“Civil Society groups want the close-to-war skirmishes in the South China Seas to stop. America’s massively superior military and navy in the South China Sea is trigger-happy and dangerous to billions of Asians,” says Katie Alsop of The RINJ Foundation which has released a South China Sea  peace plan proposal for the governments of Vietnam, The Republic of the Philippines, Brunei, the People’s Republic of China (PRC), Taiwan (Republic of China/ROC), Indonesia and Malaysia.

“China is reclaiming land and building infrastructure in its own territory, or at most, in disputed sea waters. Beijing is not grabbing a piece of land from another sovereign country. So why is Washington so eager to flex its muscles to challenge the Chinese? It’s really about the competition between an established super power and a rising one. The US using its military might in the South China Sea could be another attempt to contain the rise of China,” writes Qinduo Xu, of the The University of Melbourne

 

Read the proposed treaty for the South China Sea.

Agreement on the Disputed Territorial Collective of Islands and Reefs in the South China Sea by The Governments of Vietnam, The Republic of the Philippines, Brunei, the People’s Republic of China (PRC), Taiwan (Republic of China/ROC), Indonesia and Malaysia.

The Governments of Vietnam, The Republic of the Philippines, Brunei, the People’s Republic of China (PRC), Taiwan (Republic of China/ROC), Indonesia and Malaysia, hereinafter referred to as the “Parties”, agree to a harmonized operation of the Parties affairs in the South China Sea.

 

The Parties herein express that the Parties are determined to develop neighbourly relations among each other in the common interests of their people.

 

The Parties acknowledge that in the South China Sea there are disagreements that have yielded no solution but regardless, the Parties wish to

  1. develop neighbourly relations in the context of mitigating pollution and climate change in the South China Sea regions;
  2. managing the unfettered transit of legitimate shipping traffic; maintaining a high-gain trade relationship for all the Parties;
  3. reducing military activities and tensions in the region;
  4. preventing the intervention and unlawful waterway traversal by foreign super powers;
  5. moving forward with a binding agreement to set aside territorial disputes that prevent harmony; and
  6. co-manage the freedom of navigation and the rights of the Parties as set out in the “United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea,” not limited to but inclusive of the following:

PART III STRAITS USED FOR INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION

SECTION 1. GENERAL PROVISIONS

Article 34 Legal status of waters forming straits used for international navigation

1. The regime of passage through straits used for international navigation established in this Part shall not in other respects affect the legal status of the waters forming such straits or the exercise by the States bordering the straits of their sovereignty or jurisdiction over such waters and their air space, bed and subsoil.

2. The sovereignty or jurisdiction of the States bordering the straits Is exercised subject to this Part and to other rules of international law.

Article 35 Scope of this Part Nothing in this Part affects: (a) any areas of internal waters within a strait, except where the establishment of a straight baseline in accordance with the method set forth in article 7 has the effect of enclosing as internal waters areas which had not previously been considered as such;

(b) the legal status of the waters beyond the territorial seas of State bordering straits as exclusive economic zones or high seas; or

(c) the legal regime in straits in which passage is regulated in whole or in part by long-standing international conventions in force specifically relating to such straits.

 

Article 36 High seas routes or routes through exclusive economic zones through straits used for international navigation

This Part does not apply to a strait used for international navigation if there exists through the strait a route through the high seas or through an exclusive economic zone of similar convenience with respect to navigational and hydro-graphical characteristics; in such routes, the other relevant Parts of this Convention, including the provisions regarding the freedoms of navigation and overflight, apply.

 

SECTION 2. TRANSIT PASSAGE

Article 37 Scope of this section This section applies to straits which are used for international navigation between one part of the high seas or an exclusive economic zone and another part of the high seas or an exclusive economic zone.

 

Article 38 Right of transit passage

1. In straits referred to in article 37, all ships and aircraft enjoy the right of transit passage, which shall not be impeded; except that, if the strait is formed by an island of a State bordering the strait and its mainland, transit passage shall not apply if there exists seaward of the island a route through the high seas or through an exclusive economic zone of similar convenience with respect to navigational and hydro-graphical characteristics.

2. Transit passage means the exercise in accordance with this Part of the freedom of navigation and overflight solely for the purpose of continuous and expeditious transit of the strait between one part of the high seas or an exclusive economic zone and another part of the high seas or an exclusive economic zone. However, the requirement of continuous and expeditious transit does not preclude passage through the strait for the purpose of entering, leaving or returning from a State bordering the strait, subject to the conditions of entry to that State.

3. Any activity which is not an exercise of the right of transit passage through a strait remains subject to the other applicable provisions of this Convention.

 

Article 39 Duties of ships and aircraft during transit passage 1. Ships and aircraft, while exercising the right of transit passage, shall:

(a) proceed without delay through or over the strait;

(b) refrain from any threat or use of force against the sovereignty, territorial integrity or political independence of States bordering the strait, or in any other manner in violation of the principles of international law embodied in the Charter of the United Nations;

(c) refrain from any activities other than those incident to their normal modes of continuous and expeditious transit unless rendered necessary by force majeure or by distress;

(d) comply with other relevant provisions of this Part.

 

2. Ships in transit passage shall:

(a) comply with generally accepted international regulations, procedures and practices for safety at sea, including the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea;

(b) comply with generally accepted international regulations, procedures and practices for the prevention, reduction and control of pollution from ships.

3. Aircraft in transit passage shall: (a) observe the Rules of the Air established by the International Civil Aviation Organization as they apply to civil aircraft; state aircraft will normally comply with such safety measures and will at all times operate with due regard for the safety of navigation; (b) at all times monitor the radio frequency assigned by the competent internationally designated air traffic control authority or the appropriate international distress radio frequency.


 

The Parties Have Agreed that

Article 1

The Parties shall take all appropriate measures, within the limits of their respective jurisdictions, to organize and expand cooperation between them in the areas determined by this Agreement.

Article 2

The issues relating to fisheries shall follow unfettered traditional applications of fishing rights.

Article 3

  1. The Parties shall collaborate to preserve and develop the natural environment. In particular, they shall study measures that will promote protection of plant, animal and sea life.
  2. The Parties agree to collaborate in studying the marine environment and its future prospects, developing scientific cooperation in this field and examining possible joint activities in the field of aquaculture and resource management.

Article 4

The Parties shall be bound to keep the peace in the Region.

Article 5

Desiring to facilitate the movement of persons and goods, the Parties shall undertake to seek methods that will improve sea and air links between the Parties.

Article 6

The Parties shall promote the development of trade between each other.

Article 7

The Parties shall develop their cooperation in the area of law enforcement to the benefit of the whole, in particular to suppress illicit traffic.

Article 8

Parties shall encourage the development of their cooperation in the area of training and the exchange of teaching and administrative personnel for the purpose of co-managing the shared resources.

Article 9

The Parties shall encourage cooperation in the search and rescue, medical, hospital and sanitary fields particularly in the event of a need for medical evacuations.

Article 10

Article 11

  1. The Parties shall create a Joint Cooperation Commission of which they shall appoint the members, according to their own procedures.
  2. The Commission shall oversee the implementation of this Agreement. It shall study the means of cooperation between the Parties, any projects designed to strengthen that cooperation and the appropriate methods of implementing it. It shall establish working groups bringing together all partners with an interest in the fields specifically contemplated by this Agreement. Issues relating to fisheries shall be examined by the Joint Cooperation Commission.

Article 12

  1. The Joint Commission shall meet twice a year.
  2. The Party who hosts the meeting shall chair it.

Article 13

The Joint Commission may propose changes to this Agreement to the Parties, in particular for the purpose of expanding their cooperation to other fields. These changes shall be the subject of an agreement between the Parties.

Article 14

  1. This Agreement shall enter into force on the date it is signed.
  2. Each Party may at any time denounce this Agreement by giving a written notice to that effect. Denunciation shall take effect one hundred eighty days after the date on which the other Party is notified thereof.

Signed on this ___ of ____________ in the year _______ at ________________

by

Governments of:

Vietnam ________________

 

The Republic of the Philippines ________________

 

Brunei ________________

 

the People’s Republic of China (PRC) ________________

 

Taiwan (Republic of China/ROC) ________________

 

Indonesia ________________

 

Malaysia ________________

 

 


  1. Download the South China Sea Agreement Proposal
  2. Download UNCLOS
Law of the sea conventions

Explanation some law of the sea conventions. Source: UNCLOS