Washington goes to pieces as world boils for war. Syria is serious. [Feature]



The world wants America out of Iraq and Syria. Nobody wants that more than Syrians and Iraqis except maybe Donald Trump who in many instances has demonstrated genius in an instinctive fight against the Washington DC “Old Boys Club”.

Americans have turned on Mr. Trump because they have been misinformed, lied to and deceived out of trillions of dollars by the Pentagon. Having a big army and lots of nuclear bombs is meaningless to 50 million hungry Americans living under bridges.

Mr. Trump’s style and his personality are not exactly about poise and rationality but dig deeper and he has some good ideas that would gut the Washington DC “Old Boys Club” if let out of the bag. Trump trembles because he needs the “Old Boys Club” to get re-elected. Trump is losing all those battles in which he acquiesced to his behind-the-scenes handlers. The ‘Club’ is even sending in their emissary “John Bolton” to speak to the Democrat Party’s impeachment investigators about the real crookedness.


by Micheal John


Syrian Chaos translated to human impact.

Syrian Chaos translated to human impact.
Photo credit: Behar Abbasi
Photo Art/Cropping/Enhancement: Rosa Yamamoto FPMag

America is in bigger trouble than Syria because America’s foreign policy is not decided by elected officials like Mr. Trump, its decided by a military industrial complex that has misbehaved. American cities are crammed with the poor and the homeless. They live under bridges and on the sidewalks of the inner city. Their numbers are an overwhelmingly stark tattletale against the American Dream, but nobody listens.

Trump has been trying to change that. He needs to be stronger and stand up to the  snakes, toads, rats and lizards Melissa was talking about in her last article.

Donald Trump might be a stable genius but he wets his pants every time somebody says something critical about him or threatens him. His flip flops are embarrassing to even watch. Mental illness is difficult to watch. His family should take him home instead of suckliing off ill-gotten power.

That’s sad because Mr. Trump is correct about ending the endless wars and strangling the errant part of the military industrial complex like a Thanksgiving Turkey.

These following two worries represent the worst situation human society has ever encountered:

  1.  “We must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist.” 1961 President Dwight Eisenhower’s farewell
  2. The world is also wrestling with the negative impacts of globalization and new technologies, which have increased inequalities within societies.Today. United Nations secretary General António Guterres

The US, British, and French military industrial base may get what it wants. More war.

By Christmas, thousands of American troops; thousands of Russian troops; thousands of Turkish troops; plus thousands of Iranian forces will be facing off in Syria. Add to that incipient cataclysmic apocalypse, many thousands of Syrian Arab forces of the Assad regime want their country back and thousands of Salafist jihadists want pieces. It will not be a glorious battle.

The dangers of chaos in Syria.

The dangers of chaos in Syria.
Photo Art: Rosa Yamamoto FPMag

The dangers of Chaos in Syria. A recipe for global disaster.

With Russia, France, Britain, Iran, Israel, America, PKK / YPG, ISIS and al Qaeda (in the form of HTS) all operating combat forces inside Syria, the latter has hopelessly lost its sovereignty.

  1. Each one of these countries (Russia, France, Britain, Iran, Israel, America) has declared it will keep military forces inside Syria until what amounts to Syrian self governing stability. Stability is unlikely while these intruders remain.
  2. Each of the terror groups, PKK / YPG, ISIS and al Qaeda (in the form of HTS), claim they will remain forever by claiming a piece of Syria as their own. Each group with slightly different methods and procedures relies on instability to guarantee its presence. The instability is guaranteed by the nation-state interveners.
  3. The Syrian Bashar al-Assad regime wants Syrian sovereign lands remaining intact under Damascus control. Turkey just claimed the North 32 km and America said ‘the oil patch is ours’.
  4. America is planning to send into Syria chunks of a mechanized brigade to shore up the thousand troops remaining in Deir Ezzor and al Tanf.
  5. “US service members are stationed illegally in this area.blocking the road that connects Iraq and Syria. We demand an end to their occupation”, Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Vershinin told journalists on Wednesday.
  6. The United States has been recruiting ISIS members and various other mercenaries over the past two years for training in US bases in Iraq. They now comprise a mercenary force the US intends to use as a fighting force to face off against the mercenaries employed by Russia, Iran and Syria | maybe Turkey.

From place to place in Syria, the controlling interest of a town, village, city is different. Some cities are divided. The South is better than the North but not by much.

Syria is not the only country where the streets are in chaos. Despair is becoming prevalent around the world as something different evolves.

Whole populations are rebelling against the ruling classes which have syphoned off far too much wealth leaving children and their families starving.

The epitome of the greed in Syria is rocking the world through other channels.

Secretary-General António Guterres tours Abaco Island, Bahamas to witness at first-hand the devastation caused by Hurricane Dorian.

Secretary-General António Guterres tours Abaco Island, Bahamas to witness at first-hand the devastation caused by Hurricane Dorian.
Credit: UN Photo/OCHA/Mark Garten
Photo Art/Cropping/Enhancement: Rosa Yamamoto FPMag

United Nations Secretary General António Guterres calls this a deficit of trust in a speech to media earlier today.

We are witnessing a wave of demonstrations around the world, from the Middle East to Latin America and the Caribbean, from Europe to Africa and Asia.  Disquiet in peoples’ lives is leading to anything but quiet in streets and city squares.
Every situation is unique. Some protests are triggered by economic issues – including rising prices, persistent inequality or financial systems that benefit elites.  Others stem from political demands. And in some cases, people are reacting to corruption or different forms of discrimination.
Yet there are commonalities that span the continents – and that should force all of us to reflect and respond. We need to think about the underlying factors.
It is clear that there is a growing deficit of trust between people and political establishments, and rising threats to the social contract.
The world is also wrestling with the negative impacts of globalization and new technologies, which have increased inequalities within societies.
Even where people are not protesting, they are hurting and want to be heard.
People want a level playing field – including social, economic and financial systems that work for all.
They want their human rights respected, and a say in the decisions that affect their lives.
As I already said in my statement two weeks ago, I am deeply concerned that some protests have led to violence and loss of life.
Governments have an obligation to uphold the freedoms of expression and peaceful assembly, and to safeguard civic space.
Security forces must act with maximum restraint, in conformity with international law.
And I call on protestors to follow the examples of Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr. and other champions of nonviolent change.
There can be no excuse for violence – from any quarter.
Above all, I urge leaders everywhere to listen to the real problems of real people.
Our world needs action and ambition to build a fair globalization, strengthen social cohesion, and tackle the climate crisis.
Those are precisely the objectives of the 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals.
With solidarity and smart policies, leaders can show they “get it” – and point the way to a more just world. —Secretary General António Guterres

Yellow Helmets, Black Jackets and Umbrella Groups unite for HK democracy.

Yellow Helmets, Black Jackets and Umbrella Groups unite for HK democracy. But the streets of Hong Kong and many other cities are boiling in aggressive protests. Photo Art: Rosa Yamamoto FPMag

25-10-2019 La Paz citizen demonstration

25-10-2019 La Paz citizen demonstration. Photo Credit: UN Bolivia / Patricia Cusicanqui ~ Photo Art/Cropping/Enhancement: Rosa Yamamoto FPMag

Recent changes in America’s Foreign Policy

America is very good at killing people in large numbers. It is also good at teaching that doctrine to others. Hence America’s role in the Middle East since 2003 has been to kill millions of Muslims and to teach and provide the armaments for others to do the same.

The United States has helped displace about 20 million civilians and likely on its own has killed almost two million leaving about half a million of that number to dispute where it could be said that Bashar al-Assad and the Russians did that part on their own.

America’s continued misadventures in Syria are destabilizing. America’s President Trump said in 2018, “the USA would leave Syria”. What he did not count on was the enormous military equipment and consumable munitions sales that would be lost.

A referee is needed.

One thin hope might lie in the United Nations becoming a global moral anchor. In his annual message for UN Day on Thursday, Secretary-General António Guterres issued a reminder of the role the UN should be playing, focusing on the the real problems of real people, as a “shared moral anchor” amid “stormy global seas”.

Author’s Sidebar: ISIS is not a Terror Group

ISIS is not a terrorist organization it is an extreme concept of Sharia Islam and Jihad that is maybe a notch more extreme than the average Sunni Muslim in Saudi Arabia.  It may be the same. It will never go away until Islam reforms.

Living with ISIS in Aleppo, ar Raqqa, Tal Afar and Mosul, that quasi-immortal doctrine is something I have learned about in bold relief from the cacophony of global epitaphs. Da’esh is a doctrine that is impossible for the West to understand. It is a doctrine that is spreading, not ending. Its adherents are mostly nice people so unless a person in Aleppo or Idlib City says they are Da’esh, a person meeting them would not know.

Perhaps the confusion about the Islamic State is caused by the ‘animals’ who have gained notoriety. Recently there have been videos circulating of horrible misconducts in the Syrian Civil War. FPMag staff have looked at these videos and spotted persons who are former ISIS fighters. These are the militant jihadist fall-downs who have been seeking a job, some bread and a paycheck. Many are ‘captigon’ drug addicts, amphetamine users. They would work for ISIS because it pays well, if ISIS had money, but it doesn’t.

If ISIS Org. had Money …

Prior to the Civil War, oil and natural gas resources in northeast Syria produced a reported 400,000 barrels of oil per day. Additionally the area produced 8 billion cubic meters of natural gas annually.

Syrian oil reserves estimated at around 2.5 billion barrels are located in the area precariously occupied by U.S. military forces.

At one time in 2015, it was believed that Turkey was drawing the resources of northeast Syria into Turkey where President Erdogan’s family benefited substantially. This annoyed Russia and America.  from “Pompeo talks of US war against Turkey, NATO

In Syria, there are likely a hundred thousand adherents to the Da’esh doctrine which is a strict Sharia thinking coupled to jihad.

Some pockets are working on criminal enterprises to restore some strength. In the Iraqi area south of Shingal, west of Kirkuk, and to the east of ar Raqqa in Syria, there is a spread of ISIS elders including al-Baghdadi who is still a quasi-leader, at least revered by the followers. This group is a pious backbone of a culture that will not go away.

The United States is at a base in al Tanf which is a choke point near the Syrian, Jordanian border and not far from the Iraq border.

The US Forces are also further north along the Euphrates at a large base including an air strip.

These efforts genuinely function to block the re-emergence of ISIS and essentially control or at least surveil the comings-and-goings of actors in and out of the region.

There was a time when this was an underground highway of illicit activity but also a pipeline of humanitarian workers. It has been replaced largely by Turkish border and what has become known as the Iranian corridor.

This essentially means that the American Forces are surrounded.

They are indeed surrounded by thousands of would-be ISIS combatants, if they had money.

That is the reasoning for the belief that controlling the significant, but not outrageous Syrian oil fields and keeping them out of the hands of Da’esh. Should the Islamic State gain control of that oil and natural gas, it would drop the price and sell it through Turkey and Iran in a heartbeat.


This is why America will send chunks of a mechanized brigade into Syria to protect the fossil-fuel assets from falling into ISIS hands. Even selling oil at $2 per barrel after cost of transport, the owner would be rich enough for a ‘resurrection of the Caliphate‘  in a hurry.


Video: Watch this segment of ISIS society in a Syrian prison camp. ISIS is a far more dangerous aspect of global society than casual observers understand. Da’esh commitment is strong.

ISIS is not a terror group, it is different from all other groups like al Qaeda and HTS which are more inclined toward terrorizing their enemies for the sake of it. ISIS seems to be a true group of believers that wants to live in peace with its bizarre beliefs but sees the best way of achieving that as the conversion of others to its way of thinking, either by the word or by the sword, as per the extreme translations of the Q’ran.

 


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