America & others failed against CoV. Wearing a mask thwarts SARS-CoV2



In the United States the Center for Disease Control (CDC) says the USA is failing in its management of the COVID-19 outbreak. When that happens to just one country, all nations are in big trouble.

To avoid that,  Jacinda Ardern. Prime Minister of New Zealand has banned all inbound travelers to New Zealand. Other nations are being forced to do the same thing.


by Melissa Hemingway


Additional reading:

Infection numbers are out of sight in Mexico, Canada and the United States. The same is true for several nations in South America but it is no less true for much of the whole world.

Population: 38,749,252 adjusted for estimated real COVID-19 deaths

CanadaCasesDeathsCuredActive
Reported:4,259,37045,180 1.06% CFR4,166,86947,321
Estimate:23,554,31658,734 *0.25% IFR23,042,786261,685

*Inferred IFR is an estimate only. The actual COVID-19 IFR may not be accurately calculated for the entire human race until long after the pandemic has ended.

Canada ProvincesDeathsCFR%CasesCuredActive
COVID-19 Totals:45,1801.064,259,3704,166,86947,321
* Quebec16,7171.401,193,9641,163,98213,265
Ontario14,3420.981,459,3531,428,79816,213
Alberta4,8720.80605,757594,1556,730
BC4,2531.11384,266375,7444,269
Manitoba2,1431.43149,622145,8171,662
Sask1,5071.05143,747140,6431,597
NB4760.6276,31674,992848
Nova Scotia5180.42123,549121,6581,373
NL2350.4651,44650,639572
* PEI570.1151,41050,782571
Yukon310.634,8854,80054
NWT220.1911,51111,361128
Nunavut70.203,5313,48539
Repatriates013130
Sub Totals45,1801.064,259,3704,166,86947,321

Recoveries are estimated using a Canadian-specific algorithm. Canadian COVID-19 Data is weekly by the country. Some data CSPAC obtains from Public Health Units is updated daily.

* Quebec and * Prince Edward Island data is current daily.

Below: Extensive Estimates using data from multiple sources.

Beta experimental estimates for Canada. Reported + unreported mild + asymptomatic COVID-19 infections.

The total actual number of infections in Canada including all the untested, unreported, asymptomatic infections is likely greater than 23,554,316 (60.79% of the population) including mild and asymptomatic cases. That would mean the estimated inferred average Infection Fatality Rate:
(IFR) is likely around 0.25%

Canadian COVID-19 deaths to 2022-09-28 are estimated to be 58,886 Using estimated IFR of 0.25% which is far below global average IFR.

58,886 (0.25% IFR) is the CSPaC estimated number of Canadian COVID-19 deaths (based on the inferred IFR) including those deaths unreported as COVID-19). The IHME estimates excess deaths in Canada to reach much higher than CSPaC estimates.

See The Lancet estimate of excess mortality from COVID-19 (Download PDF) in 191 countries/territories and 252 subnational units of select countries, from 1 January 2 0 2 0, to 31 December 2 0 2 1.

58734 Is the CSPaC estimated number of Canadian COVID-19 deaths based on a modified universal algorithm which factors more sophisticated public health infrastructure and also fewer available urgent care beds and facilities which is a problem in much of Canada in an emergency measures context.

The closeness of the two numbers derived from unique data and methods suggests their high probability. The blended data of three projections from three different biostatistician labs also confirms the estimates +/- .01%.

It is safe to say that Canadians have endured the grief of losing 58734 family members. Every number has a face. May their memory be forever a blessing to their families and friends.

Canada's advanced public health standards.

Canada and the USA both have a significantly lower than global average Infection Fatality Rate. (influenza has an IFR of .1% or 6 per 100k (2019)).

Ontario, Canada Reports


Ontario Regional Public Health Units (PHU) - Reported by Ontario Province.

These reports from the Ontario Provincial government differ significantly (much lower) from the data reported by individual Public Health Units (PHU). CSPaC includes links to each PHU to allow readers of this report to check the latest data from their public health unit.


Health UnitCasesDeathsCFRRecoveriesActive
Algoma District9,647650.7%9,417165
Brant County13,058980.8%12,819141
Chatham-Kent9,7521001.0%9,532120
Hamilton65,3946080.9%64,108678
Ottawa81,9858861.1%80,397702
Durham Region67,6015100.8%66,648443
Eastern Ontario17,9522431.4%17,473236
Grey Bruce9,925790.8%9,705141
Haldimand-Norfolk9,618921.0%9,43690
Haliburton Kawartha Pine Ridge10,8191261.2%10,550143
Halton Region53,4273510.7%52,710366
Hastings & Prince Edward Counties12,340840.7%11,849407
Huron Perth8,3261251.5%8,078123
Kingston Frontenac Lennox & Addington20,403790.4%19,968356
Lambton County12,9421511.2%12,636155
Leeds Grenville And Lanark District11,2831141.0%10,878291
Middlesex-London42,8044451.0%41,850509
Niagara Region45,7935731.3%44,829391
North Bay Parry Sound District7,509620.8%7,306141
Northwestern12,273360.3%12,067170
Oxford Elgin-St.Thomas15,7641831.2%15,245336
Peel Region196,4991,4270.7%193,9381,134
Peterborough County-City8,8061001.1%8,517189
Porcupine8,247770.9%8,09674
Renfrew County And District5,920631.1%5,733124
Simcoe Muskoka District51,0014861.0%50,016499
Sudbury And District18,1421680.9%17,651323
Thunder Bay District15,5151170.8%15,099299
Timiskaming2,345251.1%2,27446
Toronto350,7914,3961.3%344,3242,071
Waterloo Region50,9374730.9%50,118346
Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph24,5281750.7%24,127226
Windsor-Essex County48,1526691.4%46,901582
York Region121,9451,0930.9%120,078774
Last Updated: 2022-09-29 Time 00:09:20 GMT. Source: CSPaC

 

 

Gretchen Whitmer

Last month, Governor Whitmer signed Executive Order 2020-91 requiring businesses to adhere to strict safety guidelines to protect workers, patrons and their communities from infection. Right now, retailers and restaurants are open as part of phase 4 of the governor’s MI Safe Start Plan. Photo Credit: Official Photo Office of the Governor of Michigan


America is in Big Trouble But it has some of the best and brightest women leaders in the world. Listen.

Arizona is one state with an alarming surge in coronavirus cases, more than 1,000 new infections per day, but that is just one thousand out of 21 thousand per day. America is driving up the global numbers and risks becoming a danger zone to the world.

 

Many countries have now banned American travelers.

U.S.A. (pop. 331,557,193)

  • CoV19 Reported Cases: 97,502,133
  • Current Reported Deaths:(CFR: 1.12%): 1,076,870 CSPaC.net estimated actual: 1,330,645
  • Cured: 94,795,655
  • Beta experimental: All time reported + unreported asymptomatic people maybe not sick, not immune, but possibly infectious and including the many people who have had several mild or asymptomatic infections: 532,258,175.54
  • 160.53% of the USA may have been infected or even reinfected including reported + estimated unreported mild and estimated asymptomatic (532,258,175.54) human infections, some of which may not have been ill in their first course of the disease, but could have spread the disease.
  • 1.12% is USA current Case Fatality Rate (CFR) &
  • 0.25% is estimated inferred average Infection Fatality Rate (IFR)
  • 1,330,645 estimated total COVID-19 deaths including unreported likely-cause excess deaths. According to projections of IHME, IHME calculation of excess deaths is slightly higher than what CSPaC is estimating.
Rest of the world excluding USA.
  • CoV19 Cases: 523,387,623
  • Deaths: 5,487,178 | 1.06%
  • Cured: 506,611,727
  • Reported + estimated all unreported 3,433,520,350

Note: Total statistics for the United States do not include these offshore territories. The US Military is included as if it is an offshore territory, not reported as continental USA data but as USA overall totals and included in world totals. FPMag evaluates these separately for many reasons.

TerritoryCasesDeathsRecovered
Continental US96,249,2181,076,870 | 1.12%94,026,983
+US Military739,137689 | 0.1%674,775
+Guam58,466401 | 0.7%57,893
+Puerto Rico 410,7935,104 | 1.24%379,494
+US Virgin Islands23,109123 | 0.5%22,887
+Northern Mariana Islands13,16640 | 0.3%13,117
+American Samoa8,24434 | 0.4%7,526
Totals97,502,1331,083,22794,795,655

The American Epicenter including ALL Territories has 12.57 % of global 'active' cases (1,623,251 USA (incl territories) / 12,918,326 Global), people infected with COVID-19 now.

Abundant proof that vaccines are working, an observation derived from unrelated data analysis.

As the epicenter we look at continental USA together with US territories and without. The significant decline in Case Fatality Rate (CFR) in the continental United States particularly, during 2 0 2 1, since vaccines became available, is believed to be due to vaccination rates and is abundant proof that the vaccines are working.

In order to avoid letting countries that refuse to report the sum of case recoveries, thus skewing global calculations, Burundi, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Britain, most provinces of Canada, Ecuador, FaeroeIslands, Falklands, Finland, France, French Polynesia, Hong Kong, Iceland, Mongolia, Laos, Netherlands, Norway, Peru, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Ukraine, South Korea, Tunisia, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Spain and Sweden 'recoveries' are estimated based on the current reported global recoveries as a percentage of all cases. (([reported recoveries]) divide (620,889,756 [Global Reported Sum of All Cases] less 34,257,654 [France Sum of Cases] less 1,003,778 [Ecuador Sum of Cases] less 13,412,263 [Spain Sum of Cases] less 8,422,336 [Netherlands Sum of Cases] less 2,583,370 [Sweden Sum of Cases] less 4,142,104 [Peru Sum of Cases])) = 97% a coefficient which is then adjusted according to the number of cases in the past 30 days and the new coefficient is applied to the sum of each of these nation's cumulative cases to estimate the missing recoveries data. In the case of France some additional hospital-sourced recovery data is factored.

Reported:
All USASum of CasesDeathsRecoveredActive
Continental USA96,249,2181,076,87094,026,9831,145,365
USA+territories97,502,1331,083,22794,795,655 1,623,251
Estimated:



USA+territories532,258,175.541,330,645524,219,9726,686,732

See The Lancet estimate of excess mortality from COVID-19 (Download PDF) in 191 countries/territories and 252 subnational units of select countries, from 1 January 2 0 2 0, to 31 December 2 0 2 1.

See also IHME Estimates for America.

Global COVID-19 Cases

Asia, Europe, Africa, America CoVID19 Cases. Click image to enlarge. Source: European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control


 Governor Gretchen Whitmer

DETROIT, Mich. — Today (11 June), Governor Gretchen Whitmer visited small businesses across Detroit to learn about what practices they have put in place to protect both workers and customers from COVID-19. She stopped by Source Booksellers, Cass Corridog, Tou & Mai, Good Times on the Ave., and City Bird to listen and talk with the owners about how her administration can best support local Michigan businesses throughout this crisis. Photo Credit: Official Photo Office of the Governor of Michigan

Feminine-Perspective Magazine are sharing Michigan State’s plan for re-opening the economy. Everyone needs to read this as an example of the responsible thing to do. In Michigan State in the USA, this is law.


Safeguards to protect Michigan’s workers from COVID-19. Here is a chance to follow the example of a woman leader who is among some 30 women leaders in the world who have had an extremely good outcome fighting COVID-19 for their communities.


  1. All businesses or operations that are permitted to require their employees to leave the homes or residences for work under Executive Order 2020-92, and any order that follows it, must, at a minimum:
    1. Develop a COVID-19 preparedness and response plan, consistent with recommendations in Guidance on Preparing Workplaces for COVID-19, developed by the Occupational Health and Safety Administration and available here. By June 1, 2020, or within two weeks of resuming in-person activities, whichever is later, a business’s or operation’s plan must be made readily available to employees, labor unions, and customers, whether via website, internal network, or by hard copy.
    2. Designate one or more worksite supervisors to implement, monitor, and report on the COVID-19 control strategies developed under subsection (a). The supervisor must remain on-site at all times when employees are present on site. An on-site employee may be designated to perform the supervisory role.
    3. Provide COVID-19 training to employees that covers, at a minimum:
      1. Workplace infection-control practices.
      2. The proper use of personal protective equipment.
      3. Steps the employee must take to notify the business or operation of any symptoms of COVID-19 or a suspected or confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19.
      4. How to report unsafe working conditions.
    4. Conduct a daily entry self-screening protocol for all employees or contractors entering the workplace, including, at a minimum, a questionnaire covering symptoms and suspected or confirmed exposure to people with possible COVID-19.
    5. Keep everyone on the worksite premises at least six feet from one another to the maximum extent possible, including through the use of ground markings, signs, and physical barriers, as appropriate to the worksite.
    6. Provide non-medical grade face coverings to their employees, with supplies of N95 masks and surgical masks reserved, for now, for health care professionals, first responders (e.g., police officers, fire fighters, paramedics), and other critical workers.
    7. Require face coverings to be worn when employees cannot consistently maintain six feet of separation from other individuals in the workplace, and consider face shields when employees cannot consistently maintain three feet of separation from other individuals in the workplace.
    8. Increase facility cleaning and disinfection to limit exposure to COVID-19, especially on high-touch surfaces (e.g., door handles), paying special attention to parts, products, and shared equipment (e.g., tools, machinery, vehicles).
    9. Adopt protocols to clean and disinfect the facility in the event of a positive COVID-19 case in the workplace.
    10. Make cleaning supplies available to employees upon entry and at the worksite and provide time for employees to wash hands frequently or to use hand sanitizer.
    11. When an employee is identified with a confirmed case of COVID-19, within 24 hours, notify both:
      1. The local public health department, and
      2. Any co-workers, contractors, or suppliers who may have come into contact with the person with a confirmed case of COVID-19.
    12. Follow Executive Order 2020-36, and any executive orders that follow it, that prohibit discharging, disciplining, or otherwise retaliating against employees who stay home or who leave work when they are at particular risk of infecting others with COVID-19.
    13. Establish a response plan for dealing with a confirmed infection in the workplace, including protocols for sending employees home and for temporary closures of all or part of the worksite to allow for deep cleaning.
    14. Restrict business-related travel for employees to essential travel only.
    15. Encourage employees to use personal protective equipment and hand sanitizer on public transportation.
    16. Promote remote work to the fullest extent possible.
    17. Adopt any additional infection-control measures that are reasonable in light of the work performed at the worksite and the rate of infection in the surrounding community.
  2. Businesses or operations whose work is primarily and traditionally performed outdoors must:
    1. Prohibit gatherings of any size in which people cannot maintain six feet of distance from one another.
    2. Limit in-person interaction with clients and patrons to the maximum extent possible, and bar any such interaction in which people cannot maintain six feet of distance from one another.
    3. Provide and require the use of personal protective equipment such as gloves, goggles, face shields, and face coverings, as appropriate for the activity being performed.
    4. Adopt protocols to limit the sharing of tools and equipment to the maximum extent possible and to ensure frequent and thorough cleaning and disinfection of tools, equipment, and frequently touched surfaces.
  3. Businesses or operations in the construction industry must:
    1. Conduct a daily entry screening protocol for employees, contractors, suppliers, and any other individuals entering a worksite, including a questionnaire covering symptoms and suspected or confirmed exposure to people with possible COVID-19, together with, if possible, a temperature screening.
    2. Create dedicated entry point(s) at every worksite, if possible, for daily screening as provided in sub-provision (b) of this section, or in the alternative issue stickers or other indicators to employees to show that they received a screening before entering the worksite that day.
    3. Provide instructions for the distribution of personal protective equipment and designate on-site locations for soiled face coverings.
    4. Require the use of work gloves where appropriate to prevent skin contact with contaminated surfaces.
    5. Identify choke points and high-risk areas where employees must stand near one another (such as hallways, hoists and elevators, break areas, water stations, and buses) and control their access and use (including through physical barriers) so that social distancing is maintained.
    6. Ensure there are sufficient hand-washing or hand-sanitizing stations at the worksite to enable easy access by employees.
    7. Notify contractors (if a subcontractor) or owners (if a contractor) of any confirmed COVID-19 cases among employees at the worksite.
    8. Restrict unnecessary movement between project sites.
    9. Create protocols for minimizing personal contact upon delivery of materials to the worksite.
  4. Manufacturing facilities must:
    1. Conduct a daily entry screening protocol for employees, contractors, suppliers, and any other individuals entering the facility, including a questionnaire covering symptoms and suspected or confirmed exposure to people with possible COVID-19, together with temperature screening as soon as no-touch thermometers can be obtained.
    2. Create dedicated entry point(s) at every facility for daily screening as provided in sub-provision (a) of this section, and ensure physical barriers are in place to prevent anyone from bypassing the screening.
    3. Suspend all non-essential in-person visits, including tours.
    4. Train employees on, at a minimum:
      1. Routes by which the virus causing COVID-19 is transmitted from person to person.
      2. Distance that the virus can travel in the air, as well as the time it remains viable in the air and on environmental surfaces.
      3. The use of personal protective equipment, including the proper steps for putting it on and taking it off.
    5. Reduce congestion in common spaces wherever practicable by, for example, closing salad bars and buffets within cafeterias and kitchens, requiring individuals to sit at least six feet from one another, placing markings on the floor to allow social distancing while standing in line, offering boxed food via delivery or pick-up points, and reducing cash payments.
    6. Implement rotational shift schedules where possible (e.g., increasing the number of shifts, alternating days or weeks) to reduce the number of employees in the facility at the same time.
    7. Stagger meal and break times, as well as start times at each entrance, where possible.
    8. Install temporary physical barriers, where practicable, between work stations and cafeteria tables.
    9. Create protocols for minimizing personal contact upon delivery of materials to the facility.
    10. Adopt protocols to limit the sharing of tools and equipment to the maximum extent possible.
    11. Ensure there are sufficient hand-washing or hand-sanitizing stations at the worksite to enable easy access by employees, and discontinue use of hand dryers.
    12. Notify plant leaders and potentially exposed individuals upon identification of a positive case of COVID-19 in the facility, as well as maintain a central log for symptomatic employees or employees who received a positive test for COVID-19.
    13. Send potentially exposed individuals home upon identification of a positive case of COVID-19 in the facility.
    14. Require employees to self-report to plant leaders as soon as possible after developing symptoms of COVID-19.
    15. Shut areas of the manufacturing facility for cleaning and disinfection, as necessary, if an employee goes home because he or she is displaying symptoms of COVID-19.
  5. Research laboratories, but not laboratories that perform diagnostic testing, must:
    1. Assign dedicated entry point(s) and/or times into lab buildings.
    2. Conduct a daily entry screening protocol for employees, contractors, suppliers, and any other individuals entering a worksite, including a questionnaire covering symptoms and suspected or confirmed exposure to people with possible COVID-19, together with, if possible, a temperature screening.
    3. Create protocols and/or checklists as necessary to conform to the facility’s COVID-19 preparedness and response plan under section 1(a).
    4. Suspend all non-essential in-person visitors (including visiting scholars and undergraduate students) until further notice.
    5. Establish and implement a plan for distributing face coverings.
    6. Limit the number of people per square feet of floor space permitted in a particular laboratory at one time.
    7. Close open workspaces, cafeterias, and conference rooms.
    8. As necessary, use tape on the floor to demarcate socially distanced workspaces and to create one-way traffic flow.
    9. Require all office and dry lab work to be conducted remotely.
    10. Minimize the use of shared lab equipment and shared lab tools and create protocols for disinfecting lab equipment and lab tools.
    11. Provide disinfecting supplies and require employees to wipe down their work stations at least twice daily.
    12. Implement an audit and compliance procedure to ensure that cleaning criteria are followed.
    13. Establish a clear reporting process for any symptomatic individual or any individual with a confirmed case of COVID-19, including the notification of lab leaders and the maintenance of a central log.
    14. Clean and disinfect the work site when an employee is sent home with symptoms or with a confirmed case of COVID-19.
    15. Send any potentially exposed co-workers home if there is a positive case in the facility.
    16. Restrict all non-essential travel, including in-person conference events
  6. Retail stores that are open for in-store sales must:
    1. Create communications material for customers (e.g., signs or pamphlets) to inform them of changes to store practices and to explain the precautions the store is taking to prevent infection.
    2. Establish lines to regulate entry in accordance with subsection (c) of this section, with markings for patrons to enable them to stand at least six feet apart from one another while waiting. Stores should also explore alternatives to lines, including by allowing customers to wait in their cars for a text message or phone call, to enable social distancing and to accommodate seniors and those with disabilities.
    3. Adhere to the following restrictions:
      1. For stores of less than 50,000 square feet of customer floor space, must limit the number of people in the store (including employees) to 25% of the total occupancy limits established by the State Fire Marshal or a local fire marshal. Stores of more than 50,000 square feet must:
        1. Limit the number of customers in the store at one time (excluding employees) to 4 people per 1,000 square feet of customer floor space.
        2. Create at least two hours per week of dedicated shopping time for vulnerable populations, which for purposes of this order are people over 60, pregnant women, and those with chronic conditions like heart disease, diabetes, and lung disease.
      2. The director of the Department of Health and Human Services is authorized to issue an emergency order varying the capacity limits described in this subsection as necessary to protect the public health.
    4. Post signs at store entrance(s) instructing customers of their legal obligation to wear a face covering when inside the store.
    5. Post signs at store entrance(s) informing customers not to enter if they are or have recently been sick.
    6. Design spaces and store activities in a manner that encourages employees and customers to maintain six feet of distance from one another.
    7. Install physical barriers at checkout or other service points that require interaction, including plexiglass barriers, tape markers, or tables, as appropriate.
    8. Establish an enhanced cleaning and sanitizing protocol for high-touch areas like restrooms, credit-card machines, keypads, counters, shopping carts, and other surfaces.
    9. Train employees on:
      1. Appropriate cleaning procedures, including training for cashiers on cleaning between customers.
      2. How to manage symptomatic customers upon entry or in the store.
    10. Notify employees if the employer learns that an individual (including a customer or supplier) with a confirmed case of COVID-19 has visited the store.
    11. Limit staffing to the minimum number necessary to operate.
  7. Offices must:
    1. Assign dedicated entry point(s) for all employees to reduce congestion at the main entrance.
    2. Provide visual indicators of appropriate spacing for employees outside the building in case of congestion.
    3. Take steps to reduce entry congestion and to ensure the effectiveness of screening (e.g., by staggering start times, adopting a rotational schedule in only half of employees are in the office at a particular time).
    4. Require face coverings in shared spaces, including during in-person meetings and in restrooms and hallways.
    5. Increase distancing between employees by spreading out workspaces, staggering workspace usage, restricting non-essential common space (e.g., cafeterias), providing visual cues to guide movement and activity (e.g., restricting elevator capacity with markings, locking conference rooms).
    6. Turn off water fountains.
    7. Prohibit social gatherings and meetings that do not allow for social distancing or that create unnecessary movement through the office.
    8. Provide disinfecting supplies and require employees wipe down their work stations at least twice daily.
    9. Post signs about the importance of personal hygiene.
    10. Disinfect high-touch surfaces in offices (e.g., whiteboard markers, restrooms, handles) and minimize shared items when possible (e.g., pens, remotes, whiteboards).
    11. Institute cleaning and communications protocols when employees are sent home with symptoms.
    12. Notify employees if the employer learns that an individual (including a customer, supplier, or visitor) with a confirmed case of COVID-19 has visited the office.
    13. Suspend all nonessential visitors.
    14. Restrict all non-essential travel, including in-person conference events.
  8. Restaurants and bars must:
    1. Limit capacity to 50% of normal seating.
    2. Require six feet of separation between parties or groups at different tables or bar tops (e.g., spread tables out, use every other table, remove or put up chairs or barstools that are not in use).
    3. Create communications material for customers (e.g., signs, pamphlets) to inform them of changes to restaurant or bar practices and to explain the precautions that are being taken to prevent infection.
    4. Close waiting areas and ask customers to wait in cars for a call when their table is ready.
    5. Close self-serve food or drink options, such as buffets, salad bars, and drink stations.
    6. Provide physical guides, such as tape on floors or sidewalks and signage on walls to ensure that customers remain at least six feet apart in any lines.
    7. Post sign(s) at store entrance(s) informing customers not to enter if they are or have recently been sick.
    8. Post sign(s) instructing customers to wear face coverings until they get to their table.
    9. Require hosts and servers to wear face coverings in the dining area.
    10. Require employees to wear face coverings and gloves in the kitchen area when handling food, consistent with guidelines from the Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”).
    11. Limit shared items for customers (e.g., condiments, menus) and clean high-contact areas after each customer (e.g., tables, chairs, menus, payment tools, condiments).
    12. Train employees on:
      1. Appropriate use of personal protective equipment in conjunction with food safety guidelines.
      2. Food safety health protocols (e.g., cleaning between customers, especially shared condiments).
      3. How to manage symptomatic customers upon entry or in the restaurant.
    13. Notify employees if the employer learns that an individual (including an employee, customer, or supplier) with a confirmed case of COVID-19 has visited the store.
    14. Close restaurant immediately if an employee shows multiple symptoms of COVID-19 (fever, atypical shortness of breath, atypical cough) and perform a deep clean, consistent with guidance from FDA and the Center for Disease Control. Such cleaning may occur overnight.
    15. Require a doctor’s written release to return to work if an employee has a confirmed case of COVID-19.
    16. Install physical barriers, such as sneeze guards and partitions at cash registers, bars, host stands, and other areas where maintaining physical distance of six feet is difficult.
    17. To the maximum extent possible, limit the number of employees in shared spaces, including kitchens, break rooms, and offices, to maintain at least a six-foot distance between employees.
  9. Employers must maintain a record of the requirements set forth in Sections 1(c), (d), and (k).
  10. The rules described in sections 1 through 9 have the force and effect of regulations adopted by the departments and agencies with responsibility for overseeing compliance with workplace health-and-safety standards and are fully enforceable by such agencies. Any challenge to penalties imposed by a department or agency for violating any of the rules described in sections 1 through 9 of this order will proceed through the same administrative review process as any challenge to a penalty imposed by the department or agency for a violation of its rules.
  11. Any business or operation that violates the rules in sections 1 through 9 has failed to provide a place of employment that is free from recognized hazards that are causing, or are likely to cause, death or serious physical harm to an employee, within the meaning of the Michigan Occupational Safety and Health Act, MCL 408.1011.
  12. Nothing in this order shall be taken to limit or affect any rights or remedies otherwise available under law.

Given under my hand and the Great Seal of the State of Michigan.

Gretchen Whitmer, Governor


Feminine-Perspective:

The Appeal to the World To Join One Another in Solidarity Against COVID-19 seems to work for those who join.



1. Wash your hands.

2. Wear an N-95 mask carefully when you go for groceries, pharmacy, doctor’s appointments, and children’s vaccinations. (Urgent. Keep those vaccinations up to date to avoid tragic co-morbid complications.)

3. Do not touch your face with uncleaned hands.

4. Stay Safe at Home as much as possible. Avoid all physical engagement with persons outside your household.

 

Courtesy The World Health Organization

Courtesy The World Health Organization

Courtesy The World Health Organization

Courtesy The World Health Organization