Editorial: Something is very wrong with the doctrine of world institutions. Lives matter.



America & Ukraine must stop shelling Donetsk PR & Luhansk PR

Clearly the sloppy Minsk agreements did not work inasmuch as shelling of the breakaway nations in Donbass never stopped, only occasionally lulled and flared, especially during the time of the COVID-19 pandemic.

On Monday the Russian Federation said it will provide security for the millions of ethnic Russians in these two 2014 self-proclaimed Republics. At last, somebody identified the issue, hopefully without exploitation.

The European Union, the United Nations in all its many parts, and ‘NATO’ are not well led toward global values if their only response to the security problem in the Donbass is to quarrel over who is the owner. The people there are the owners.

The safety of the people of Donetsk PR and Luhansk PR must be worth something, to at least themselves. That needs to be recognized as well as their right of self-determination.

Providing more weapons to the parties assailing these tiny enclaves of dissatisfied civilians is just plain sick.

This doctrine of global institutions which has failed the human condition must change.

Allowing an unstable, untrustworthy USA to lead the bloodshed, a country that randomly kills children with drones, invades weak nations without cause, imprisons more of its own people than any nation on Earth and cannot stay out of catastrophic wars it starts, is a selective blindness at the core of the world’s failing institutions.

The assumption by world leaders that “the problem is the bad behaviour of the people” is going to end up in a massive, globe-killing war. The people around the world are dissatisfied with leadership in general. Donetsk and Luhansk could be the example of what has yet to come. If true, or not, those lives matter.

Celebrating he possibility shelling could stop

Some of the women celebrating the prospect that the shelling could stop in the Donetsk PR.
Photo: Courtesy The RINJ Foundation,
Art/Cropping/Enhancement: Rosa Yamamoto FPMag