Listen to John Kerry. Rain, floods, hot days, forest fires, typhoons, pandemic… are we screwed? Or just need to adapt? Editorial.



From London to Manila, people are being evacuated from dangerous floods. In many parts of the world people are losing their homes to raging forest fires on scorching hot days that have no precedent.

According to NASA, “While there’s not yet a full consensus on the matter, in recent years a body of evidence linking extreme weather with climate change has begun to emerge. Evidence from satellites, aircraft, ground measurements and climate model projections are increasingly drawing connections. Quantifying those interconnections is a big challenge.”


Comment by Sharon Santiago

This article is being written on a tiny netbook by candle light after 20 solid days of hard rain started landslides, flooded streets and homes—then turned the power off. But relief is in the weather forecast. Meanwhile, experts say we must try to adapt.


Extreme weather around the world makes action on climate change urgent says American Climate Change Czar.

Video: According to CBS which just scooped the world on Climate Change if John Kerry is the real Czar:  “John Kerry is in London pushing global efforts against climate change. This push comes as record weather events are appearing, triggered by climate change domestically and worldwide. Roxana Saberi sat down with the former Secretary of State in an interview you will only see on CBS News.”

Video: Unprecedented flooding from persistent rains. The Jingguang Tunnel disaster (North Road tunnel) Henan Province, People’s Republic of China.

The incipient stages of climate change impact on human lives, as predicted, is here now. Apparently Beijing believes that it needs to burn more oil and gas as it pirates the South China Sea for its cursed richness in fossil fuel resources.

Burning oil was what got us into this polluted mess.

Joao Teixeira, co-director of the Center for Climate Sciences at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, and science team leader for the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA’s Aqua satellite, sums up the situation with candor. “Within the scientific community it’s a relatively well-accepted fact that as global temperatures increase, extreme precipitation will very likely increase as well,” he says. “Beyond that, we’re still learning.”

“Within the scientific community it’s a relatively well-accepted fact that as global temperatures increase, extreme precipitation will very likely increase as well. Beyond that, we’re still learning.”
– Joao Teixeira, co-director of the Center for Climate Sciences at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. Credit: NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). Art/Cropping/Enhancement: Rosa Yamamoto FPMag

Flooding in China

A harowing story of desperation and rescue unfolded in Zhongmu County of Zhengzhou, central China’s Henan Province, July 22, 2021. Photo Credit: Xinhua/Cai Yang

The Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) has warned that scattered to widespread flooding, rain-induced landslides are likely, blah blah blah. No kidding.

Meanwhile, the real information is that no weather disturbance is expected to affect the Philippines in the next two to three days, PAGASA forecaster Meno Mendoza said hours ago.

We will need kilometers of clothes lines to get everything dry, again, but first must seee who needs to be dug out of a landslide and who needs clean drinking water…

Sharon